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Eight New Ultrasound scanners unveiled at Queen’s Hospital Burton

QHB Ultrasound

Eight brand new state-of-the art ultrasound scanners have been unveiled at Queen’s Hospital Burton as part of a £600,000 investment by University Hospitals of Derby and Burton.

Lauren Grimadell, Clinical Manager for Obstetric Ultrasound, said: “These new scanners really are a wonderful addition to the services we already provide within imaging, and will provide a wider range of scans and examinations which we can offer to our patients.

The scanners, which are a mixture of replacement scanners and new additions to the departments, will be used by our Antenatal Sonography Team and our General Sonography Team. Six of the new machines will be based at Queen’s Hospital Burton and the two other machines will be based at Samuel Johnson Community Hospital and Royal Derby Hospital.

Dave Tipper, General Manager for Imaging, said: “We are absolutely delighted to have received the funding for these incredible new machines. Not only are we investing in new equipment, but we’re also investing in our services that we provide to our communities and our training and development within the wider imaging team.”

Peter Machin, Clinical Manager for General Ultrasound, said: “The new scanners are an exciting development for the Trust. It has been a real honour to have been welcomed in to a Trust with such prestigious resources and funding.”

The machines are being used by sonographers and radiologists in scanning abdominal, gynaecological, musculoskeletal and vascular areas of the body.

An ultrasound machine sends out high-frequency sound waves, which reflect off body structures. A computer receives the waves and uses them to create a picture. Unlike with an x-ray or CT scan, this test does not use ionising radiation.