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Information on your lung condition

The ImpACT+ team supports people with long-term lung conditions. You can find out more information about the most common long-term respiratory diseases below.

Asthma

Asthma is a long-term condition that affects the bronchial airways (that is, the tubes that carry air in and out of the lungs). The airways narrow intermittently causing symptoms of breathlessness, wheezing or coughing.


You may find the following websites useful
 


Videos relating to asthma
 


We have listed some of the most useful Asthma UK videos from the playlist above:
 

Bronchiectasis

Bronchiectasis is a long-term condition where the airways of the lungs become abnormally widened, leading to a build-up of excess mucus that can make the lungs more vulnerable to infection. 

People with bronchiectasis often cough up lots of sputum, they also have a tendency to have repeated chest infections.
 

The above video contains detailed information and advice for people with bronchiectasis. This video can be viewed in full-screen by viewing via the YouTube website (opens in new window) > and pressing 'f' on your keyboard.


You may find the following bronchiectasis websites useful
 


Chest clearance

People with bronchiectasis usually need to clear their sputum (mucus) every day to minimise the risk of chest infections. You can find guidance on this below.
 

COPD

Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD), is a long-term condition where the bronchial airways (the tubes that carry air in and out of the lungs) have become narrowed. This means it is more difficult to get air in and out of the lungs.

Symptoms include breathlessness, coughing, wheezing and recurrent chest infections.


You may find the following websites useful
 


You may find the following videos helpful
 


You may find the following document(s) useful
 

Lung fibrosis / Interstitial Lung disease

Interstitial lung disease is a general term meaning that there is swelling (inflammation) or scarring (fibrosis) of the lung tissue surrounding and supporting the alveoli air sacs and the bronchial airways.

The term "pulmonary" or "lung fibrosis" is used when there is scarring and not just swelling.
 


 

This 30 minute video gives general advice for people with a recent diagnosis of lung fibrosis, made by the ImpACT+ team. This video can be viewed in full-screen by viewing via the YouTube website (opens in new window) > and pressing 'f' on your keyboard.


You may find the following websites useful


You may find the following videos helpful


Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis (IPF) - a particular type of lung fibrosis

Pulmonary hypertension

Pulmonary hypertension is condition where there is high blood pressure in the blood vessels that carry blood to the lungs. The blood vessels are called the pulmonary arteries. The word ‘pulmonary’ means to do with the lungs. The word ‘hypertension’ means high blood pressure. Common symptoms include breathlessness and fatigue.


You may find the following websites useful
 


Videos relating to pulmonary hypertension
 

Sarcoidosis

Sarcoidosis is a condition where parts of the body become inflamed and swollen (due to granulation tissue). Sometimes the inflammation resolves but at other times it can lead to fibrosis and scarring.

The inflammation or fibrosis can damage the function of various body organs. It most commonly affects the lungs. The symptoms are very variable depending on which body organs are affected.
 

You may find the following websites helpful
 

 

Videos relating to sarcoidosis
 

Other lung diseases

The information on this page relates only to the most common respiratory conditions. However, there is information about more respiratory diseases on the British Lung Foundation website link below (look at the lung conditions panel, make sure you click "show all" to view all diseases).

Get more information about lung conditions (opens in new window) >